Dating sites with beauty standards

Men feel helpless; they feel that they are forced to leap through hoops in order to win women’s approval and hope that she will pick him against all odds. In fact, not only is the idea that women somehow control all the power in sex and dating not true, but it’s a case of people asking the wrong question.

It’s a cluster of self-limiting beliefs that holds people back from meeting new and exciting potential partners, whether it’s for sex or for relationships.

Today January 3 is also set to be the UK’s busiest ever day for online dating, according to Match.com, with dating app users scrolling through an average of 43 profiles and message 22 people on their first day back in the office.

It must be stated that this is nothing new to gay and bisexual men who, when compared to their straight counterparts, have historically reported higher percentages of eating disorders and generally experience more cultural and sexual pressure to come to terms with their body image, whether it be issues of weight, racial objectification and preference, or masculinity.

Earlier this year, Vanity Fair declared Tinder as the ultimate place that twentysomethings go to “hit it and quit it”, claiming that the app was solely responsible for a “dating apocalypse”.

While die-hard romantics might agree, others say the app has revolutionised the process of hunting down no-strings fun at relatively little expense. But the pickier you are, the fewer matches you’ll receive, so if you’re looking for a casual hookup - get swiping.

These concerns surrounding the "ideal" traits that make a man physically attractive, in no small part thanks to the mass media, are beginning to affect men everywhere, especially young boys.

The male beauty market has reacted with exponential statistics: The number of men’s beauty products increased by more than 70% worldwide between 20.

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